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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
and democratic attorney general. one of our two u.s. senators was an independent, elected twice. an independent missed winning the governorship by 15,000 votes over a million passed in 1973. we were the ticket splitting capital of america. we have cents settled back into partisan voting with the rest of america. this is a very polarized era. having said that, when you have close elections you still have a band of voters who will mix and match on the ballot, either because they want to mix and match or they are simply reacting to the individual candidates. in the case of romney and kaine, i have personally been in situations where straw votes were taken among large groups and you generally find you have 3, 4, 5% of the romney boaters picking tim kane for various reasons. some of these romney voters are more moderate republicans and the like tim kane better than his opponent. are there similar voters for obama and george allen? i am sure there are. i never met one of them. but i will say this -- george allen, despite what happened in 2006, he has won from time to time in running for statewide off
as he continues to that 2014 deadline for u.s. troops out of the afghanistan. the ceremonies get under way later this morning we'll have live coverage at 11:00 eastern here on c-span. washington journal continues on this sunday november 11. we'll be back in a moment. >> some patients require special therapy, hip knows sis is effect nive certain types of battle northeast rose sis f. >> now you're deep asleep. we're going back now, going back to -- one of the most important procedures is group psychotherapy. here under the psych tryst guidance the patient lerns to understand something of the basis causes of his distress. >> i'd like to see if we can get some illustrations about how one's personal safety would stem from childhood safety. if i had done anything wrong afseshamed of i would tell them what i had done so i kept it to myself. >> this weekend on c-span 3 let there be light. his world war ii dk meantry on combat trauma and treatment. today at 4 p.m. eastern. >> i want my fiction to be intensely journalistic because unless you get out and look at what is going on these days, you'r
the biggest impact in the u.s.? >> one of the most powerful campaigns was the trayvon martin case. a 17-year-old african-american, killed in florida, tragically. two weeks after the incident, there was no media coverage of all. a private injustice. the parents start a petition, and then it goes viral. the importance is not just the individual acts of arresting his killer in prosecuting him, but the public. the result, the awareness of the tragic situation of young african-americans not being treated fairly in the justice system or the "stand your ground" laws, where you can almost impunitively shoot someone. that is some of the really exciting things we see. >> in trayvon martin's case, clearly there was an impact, but they were not waiting. they were in there pretty soon, on the case. what i want to ask you -- do you find a difference in the way that companies -- you have a lot of petitions aimed at companies that do specific things. obviously, some have had more political implications. is there a difference in response between business institutions and political institutions? >> politician
pledge. [video clip] >> what i would say to grover norquist is the sequester destroys the u.s. military. according to our secretaire defense, it would be shooting ourselves in the hip. a smaller army since 1940 and the smallest airports in the history of the country. sequestration must be replaced. i'm willing to generate revenue. it's fair to ask my party to put revenue on the table. i will not raise tax rates to do it. i will cap deductions. if you can deduct and around $30,000 or $40,000, you can raise $1 trillion in revenue. the people who would lose deductions would be upper-income americans. i want entitlement reforms to do this. democrats always promised to cut spending, but we never cut spending. i'm looking for more revenue for entitlement reform before the end of the year. >> let me press you one more time on grover norquist. he said you are not inclined to go through on this promise to raise revenues because you like being a senator. your response? >> i love being a senator and i want to be a senator who matters for the state of south carolina and the country. when you are $1
back to that expert, mark twain. he says about music what i would say about the u.s.-china relationship. --said about wagner's music he was a great music critic. britney spears'spair not asand said, "it's good as it looks." [laughter] >> thank you. >> let me pick up on a point he made earlier. it is a complex idea. a great challenge that we face and might face is managing this relationship. in this context, i want to stress what i see as two of the major issues of challenge. first, the internal challenge. we tend to assume that china is growing at an% a year -- 10% per year, but i think that is wrong. i think we will see a combination of economic and internal political reasons. china is entering, my guess is a very difficult period. the society has outgrown the political system that brought the revolution. we have seen decided grow in the way it has. it has substantial measure because of its economic growth. i like to do this when i give talks about china. this is one of the most revolutionary technologies of any kind -- cell phone. it is relevant because there are millions of cell phon
to the polls tomorrow and have been voting early, how confident are you in the u.s. electoral system? here are the numbers to call. host: you can also find us online, using social media. send us a tweet using journal@c- span.org -- twitter.com/c- spanwj. or find a conversation on facebook. you can also e mail us, twitter.com/c-spanwj. how confident are you in the u.s. electoral system? we will bring some articles on how early voting is unfolding, but first, here is the headline from "usa today." 48% to 48%. "it comes down to turnout." host: what do you think about the u.s. electoral system as we head into the final day? voters go to the polls tomorrow. in "u.s. a today," the two candidates made their pitch for why you should vote for them. barack obama, mitt romney, writing in to "usa today," sharing their opinions. president obama says -- "do not give up, we have had a rise in jobs and a rebound in growth." governor romney says -- "we need a new beginning." looking at the headline of "the wall street journal," it gives us an idea of where the candidates were over the weekend. you can see
of maryland, and along with that the first openly gay member of the u.s. senate was elected in wisconsin. here is tammy baldwin. [video clip] >> i did not run to make history. i ran to make a difference. [applause] a difference in the lives of families struggling to find work and pay the bills, a difference in the lives of students worried about debt. [applause] and seniors, worried about their retirement security. [applause] a difference in the lives of veterans who fought for us and need someone fighting for them and their families. [applause] a difference in the lives of entrepreneur weres -- entrepreneurs try to build a business and economic security. [applause] but in choosing me to tackle those challenges, the people of wisconsin have made history. [applause] host: this tweet from benjamin netanyahu, the prime minister of israel, who congratulates u.s. president barack obama on his election victory. fort lauderdale, florida. independent line. caller: thank you for taking my call. host: did you vote yesterday or early in florida? caller: a voted early. actually, i went out and did some la
a chance to turn the u.s. around and i believe he is genuine. thank you. host: the next caller from new york on the democratic line. caller: thanks for taking my call. that last call was interesting to me because it seems romney's solution is a big huge tax cut for the wealthy in this country. president obama came in with the bush recession and he's put the stimulus in place and he has put in many other policies that have helped this country stabilize and created 5 million jobs. and what will mitt romney do? cut taxes. that's not a solution. mitt romney has no credibility on domestic policy or international policy. if you're solution for everything that ails us is tax cuts, that's not going to work. look at the bush tax cuts from 04. in the debate, he agreed with president obama on 95% of everything and when he tried to get president obama on libya, he failed. he has no credibility. he will say anything to win and i think that's why president obama will prevail on november 7 because he deserves reelection. he's a great president. host: we can see mitt romney talking to supporters there
around the world. and you saw him during the 2012 u.s. campaign. he was campaign manager for the landslide reelection of california governor in 2006. before that a top political advice sor in the white house of george w. bush. he attended the university of delaware from 1988 to 1993. david plouffe crossed paths in schmidt in the late 1980's. he completed his political seasons degree and finned two years ago. he has completed two presidential bids. he was appointed as a senior advice sor to the president in the white house in 2011. he attended is the marks high school before serving in a wide viret of state and national political campaigns. i'm going to ask the two speakers this evening to speak and i had to decide who is going to go first and i decided to use a standard that anyone this this audience could mean and that is whoever has won the most recent presidential election gets to speak first. i think that's the fair enough thing to do so please welcome david plouffe and steve schmidt to the university of delaware. [applause] >> thank you for joining thus evening. it's
of the national senatorial committee made a statement this morning regarding last night. u.s. senator john cornyn tonight made the following statement. here is the "new york times" and how they played last night's election. here is the, "wall street journal." the "washington times." andy "washington post" -- and the "washington post." cynthia on the democrat's line, good morning. caller: my view is how to do with the racism. there is a much divisiveness in terms of the racism. in order for both parties to move ahead, i think that's something needs to be done there. there is racism, and the other topic was how women were huge, especially by the republicans. women are people prepared -- our people. god gave us all the power to think on our own and there is nowhere that he says women cannot make choices. and men, especially on the republican side, are going to have to realize that women should be able to say what we allow with our bodies and not allow. host: can you give us an example of what you mean by racism in yesterday's election? caller: racism in terms of black and white, hispanic -- host: yo
is in his job as u.s. senator. [applause] but more important than that i'm here as a mom and a citizen who is very concerned about the future for our kids and for our country. and i know and have come to see that mitt romney is the right candidate for us for president. he is the man with the record. [applause] . he is, right. mitt romney is the man with the record, the experience and the character to begin to turn things around, to begin to change things in wash wark, to break the gridlock abdomen make the change that is we need to get our country back on track so we all need to do everything that we can to be sure that he is elected as the next president of the united states. and what i like to think today is that we have five more days to avoid four more years. [applause] so it's just great to be here with all of you. it's great to feel this energy in ohio. it's going to be close but we are headed in the right direction. it's my pleasure to introduce a friend of mine and that is our special guest. you all know her. you all know she's our ohio born and bread. she went to ohio state here.
glal agenda program. we will explore america's role in the world, the way u.s. influence is felt across the globe in terms of our military, pop culture, technology, innovation, influence on human rights and promotion of democracy and our role as -- what the global agenda website for information about our speakers after the first of the year. if any of you are not already on the e-mail list for kirk -- programs like this, put your name on the sheik in the lobby. let's please thank our panelists. [applause] good night, everyone [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] x up next, a discussion on some of the challenges facing women balancing work and personal life. then the chairman of cbs news talks about the future of journalism and network news. later, ted koppel on democracy and the media. >> your career officers, you changed this army so that it became a volunteer army. go and find your soldiers in the labor market. go find in the villages and towns in america. over five or six years, we created an absolutely splen
in the world, the way u.s. influence is felt across the globe in terms of our military, pop culture, technology, innovation, influence on human rights and promotion of democracy and our role as -- what the global agenda website for information about our speakers after the first of the year. if any of you are not already on the e-mail list for programs like this, put your name on the sheet in the lobby. let's please thank our panelists. [applause] good night, everyone. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> in a few moments, today's headlines in your calls live on "washington journal." here is some of this morning's thanksgiving program. we will bring you a memorial service for neil armstrong. then a conversation on teenage life in the white house with susan ford. then a look at the evolution of case law. -- of facebook. in 45 minutes, we will get the latest on the conflict in gaza. at a 30 a.m. eastern, a look at poverty in the united states. -- 8:30
have one of these packages, you pay an average with taxes in the u.s., $160. in france you pay $38 u.s., and you get worldwide calling. you get worldwide television, and your internet is 20 times faster at of loading when 10 times foster -- 20 times faster at of loading and 10 times faster at downloading. all of them understand that the railroads were increasingly important. you had to move things like steel. the 20th century came along. with highways and airports that were crucial to economic growth. now it is the information super hero. david k. johnston on the many ways corporations tried to rob you blind, saturday night at 10:00 a.m. eastern and sunday night at 9:00. now reaction to a election results from media activists. we will hear from the tea party patriots. this is 40 minutes. >> good afternoon. my name is richard. i am going to speak for a few minutes. and i am going to introduce five nationally known as conservative leaders. we will each talk for a little bit, and then we will open it for q&a. the battle to take over the republican party begins today, and there comes some
and three u.s. territories are on the ground. 90% of those are volunteers. last night about 7600 people stayed in more than 110 shelters. to date, we have served more than 3.3 million meals. in fact, provided more than 29,000 health services and mental health, emotional support, and handed out 125,000 relief items. we are mobilizing a large relief effort this weekend, providing comfort kits and other import materials to those who will need them in the coming days. you have a lot of questions, so that i will turn it back over to it had 34 questions. thank you. >> thank you. we will be taking questions from reporters. i ask that you ask one question so we can get to as many as possible today. with that, operator, can we have our first question please? >> if you want to ask a and pleas deess * 1 yearning. one moment. -- and please state your name. what mom. the first question comes from jeffs. >> want to ask about temporary housing. i know out on staten island today have no hotels or motels. where are you putting those people? are they going to another state or other boroghs in new york? >
.m. eastern and again on sunday nights at 9:00 p.m. eastern and pacific. next, a debate for a u.s. house seat in minnesota. michele bachmann faces a jim graves in their final of three debates. she is in her third term and was a republican presidential candidate this year. jim graves has a background in business and is the founder of a national hotel franchise. this the belt was held in st. paul, minn., and is about 20 minutes. let met ronnie thought no one was looking, and he said 47% of the american people were not willing to take responsibility for themselves. who does he think he is? not where i come from. not here in lakewood. not in cleveland. those people have been the backbone of this country. let me tell you who they are. there are people working and making a salary. they are >> welcome back, today we have a live debate in the sixth congressional district, the district including cities like st. cloud and monticello. i am joined by the incumbent congresswoman, michele bachmann, and jim graves, thank you. knowing that you are down to the final hours of your campaign, hopefully we can le
for minority communities in the u.s.. this is hosted by the joint center for political and economic studies. is just over 50 minutes. >> good morning and welcome. thank you for being here. i am the founder and president of this organization. it is an organization that has been a strategic communications but is not partisan. i am very honored and delighted to have a terrific set of panelists to -- to offer the audience today. we have to audiences today inside the capital area in a hearing room of the foreign affairs committee. i would like to thank -- >> this is the program we just showed you. we apologize for that. we do mean to show you the event for the joint center for political and economic studies. this is the one looking at the impact of the african-american vote this year. >> battleground states. analysts will continue to look at and interpret the results for some time to come, but i was struck last night by several things. the fact that the president was able to hold onto his vote totals from 2008 in a number of key battleground areas despite much speculation that he would be hurt b
election. host: hillary clinton would be the best prepared candidate. one who has lived in the u.s. senate, a woman who knows virtually every head of state in the world and is a strong opinion of the inclusion of -- social inclusion. i come close but will not talk about that until hillary -- people decide what to do. >> what is your decision making process moving forward -- her process moving card forward? guest: i supported her in 2008 over barack obama. she ran for president, i would be very excited. i have to say i played for time out. here is what is wrong. if we in the media start speculating right now about 2016, even about 2014, we're not doing our jobs. i got to say that because what is wrong with this country is a perpetual campaign. it is not supposed to work that way. you have a campaign and you fought like hell for you believe then and you win or lose in the new take time out to govern. that is what these people across the street have to do. not in campaign mode but in governing mode. six problems, especially the fiscal and immigration reform. i sound like i am preaching the ta
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)